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Various - Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit album mp3


Tracklist

Rythim Is Rythim* It Is What It Is 5:36
Blake Baxter Forever And A Day 5:36
Eddie "Flashin'" Fowkes* Time To Express 5:41
K.S. Experience Electronic Dance 6:36
Members Of The House Share This House (Radio Mix) 5:56
A Tongue & D Groove Feel Surreal 6:55
Mia Hesterley Spark 6:09
Juan* Techno Music 7:20
Inner-City* Featuring Kevin Saunderson Big Fun 7:39
Blake Baxter Ride Em Boy 7:02
Shakir* Sequence 10 5:20
Idol Making Un, Deux, Trois 6:05
Various Detroit Is Jacking (The Techno! Megamix) 13:49

Versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
DIXG 75 Various Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit ‎(2xLP, Comp) 10 Records DIXG 75 UK 1988
303 322-406 Various Techno · The New Dance Sound Of Detroit ‎(2xLP, Comp) 10 Records, Virgin 303 322-406 Europe 1988
DIX G 75 Various Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit ‎(2xLP, Comp, W/Lbl) 10 Records DIX G 75 UK 1988
DIXCD 75 Various Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit ‎(CD, Comp) 10 Records DIXCD 75 UK 1988
CDIXG 75 Various Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit ‎(Cass, Comp) 10 Records CDIXG 75 UK 1988


Various - Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit album mp3
Performer: Various
Genre: Electronic
Title: Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit
Country: UK
Released: 1988
Style: Techno, House
MP3 version ZIP size: 1116 mb
FLAC version RAR size: 1715 mb
Rating: 4.5
Votes: 512
Other Formats: DXD MP4 AAC DTS AUD DMF MMF

SiIеnt
Stuart Cosgrove's liner notes:think of detroit and you automatically think of motown, but be careful not to think too loud because the new grandmasters of detroit techno hate history.juan atkins, 26 years old, and the self proclaimed captain of the techno sound is an articulate enemy of motown's supreme being. "berry gordy built the motown sound on the same principle as the conveyor belt at the ford plant. today the automobile plants use robots and computers to make their cars and i'm more interested in fords robots than gordy's music."techno music is unashamedly modern in it's out-look. it is a mesmerising underground of new music which looks to the future, breaks with the past and blends european industrial pop with black american garage funk. according to derrick may, the immensely gifted young producer who works under the pseudonyms rhythim is rhythim and mayday, his music goes "beyond the beat". it is not simply dance music but a series of sound experiments that often defy the logic of more uncomplicated dance sounds like chicago house.the origins of techno date back to the late 70's to the supressed identity of european synthesiser groups like kraftwerk and yello and to british electronic funk groups like heaven 17, new order and the human league. their music established the synthesiser as the creative core of new music, encouraging a whole generation of young musicians to turn their basements into makeshift studios. unknown to europe the ears of black america were listening with increasing facsination reversing the age-old flow of musical influence.in west detroit, juan atkins a student at the city's belleville high school and an obsessive fan of kraftwerk, began to compose basic drum patterns on an old roland d115 eventually graduating to more complex synthesiser tracks which borrowed heavily from europe.juan's first group cybotron released several records at the height of the electro-funk boom in the early 80's, the most succesful being a truly progressive homage to the city of detroit simply entitled 'techno city'. at the time he believed the record was a unique and adventurous piece of synthesiser funk, more in tune with germany than the rest of black america, but on a dispiriting visit to new york, juan heard afrika bambaataa's 'planet rock' and realised that his vision of a spartan electronic dance sound had been upstaged.he returned to detroit to renew his friendship with 2 younger students from belleville high, kevin saunderson and derrick may, and quietly over the next few years the three of them became the creative backbone of detroit techno.most of the tracks on this lp are the work of the belleville 3, juan's 'techno music' and the kevin saunderson experience's 'electronic dance' reflect the basic studio beat of techno, whilst derrick may's rhythim is rhtyhim track takes the music into the most unlikely areas turning new age ambience and film-soundtrack instrumentation into complex dance music.derrick may is undoubtedly the philosopher of techno! he sees the music as post-soul and believes it marks a deliberate break with previous traditions of black american music. "the music is just like detroit" he claims, "a complete mistake, it's like george clinton and kraftwerk are stuck in an elevator with only a sequencer to keep them company."amidst the experimental strangeness of this album are other more obviously commercial dance records. 'share this house' by members of the house which actually features george clinton as an uncredited visiting producer, takes its main influences from the chicago jack virus.inevitably the detroit techno sound will be compared to the music of the nearby city of chicago,a problem that neither angers nor concerns the producers of techno! blake baxter, detroit's soft spoken sex symbol, and the whispered mind behind the promiscous 'ride em boys', has already had several hits in the chicago area, and derrick may's best known records to date - 'nude photo' & 'strings' - were instrumental in taking chicago's music into the abstract and lysergic mood now described as 'acid house.'but derrick believes there's a huge differance between chicago house and detroit techno! "it's a question of respect, house still has it's heart in 70's disco, we don't have any of that respect for the past, it's strictly future music. we have a much greater aptitude for experimentation."techno is undoubtedly the music of detroit but it has none of the latter day optimism of motown. the city is reflected in the music in an unsettling way. "factories are closing and people are drifting away" says derrick, "the old industrial detroit is falling apart, the structures have collapsed. it's the murder capital of america. six year olds carry guns and thousands of black people have stopped caring if they ever work again. if you make music in that environment it can't be straight music. in britain you have new order, well our music is the new disorder."techno's sudden shift of tempo and relentless war on familiarity makes it sound like free form jazz for the computer era. it may well be the music of the new disorder but it promises to join george clinton's funkadelia and prince's minneapolis sound as one of the most experimental forms of music black america has ever produced.
FailCrew
The only weak side to this compilation is Members Of The House - 'Share This House'. It really shouldn't have been included on this LP.
Rarranere
I agree that it's funky (as only Detroit can do), but the somewhat tacky vocals spoil it for me. The House mix on the 12" version is a lot better and nearly all instrumental.
Tinavio
Each to his own but Members Of The House - 'Share This House' is one hell of a techno funk groove and 100% deserves to be on this compilation! If you can't feel the vibe in this groove you need to get your ears tested...
Fordg
Also agree. Regardless who the artist/s are or are not. Not only the Members Of The house track shouldn't have been included on this comp, it's so rubbish it shouldn't be included anywhere on any comp or release. Cheesy, tacky crap as far as I'm concerned . To be honest, I think side D is also a waste of vinyl space. Never liked mashup mixes of the same tracks (already featured) on comps and still don't. I realise the label might've had restraints due to lack of material available and in trying to get the record pressed and out to the wider public, but still. Might aswell contain a blank side as far as I'm concerned. Share My House is still rubbish though. The rest of the LP is a classic.
iSlate
I think you're getting confused? Derrick Carter is actually from Chicago.
Balhala
digitalsoul1973 is indeed correct. Nothing to do with Chicago's Derrick Carter. Members Of The House have actually included various writers, singers and producers throughout the years 1987 - 1995 : https://www.discogs.com/artist/7823-Members-Of-The-House .
Thetalune
There's been plenty of members of that group, but not sure Derrick Carter was ever one.
watchman
Yes agree - actually a very early pseudonym of Derrick carter ????
Perilanim
Of course Inner-City* Featuring Kevin Saunderson Big Fun is a classic...Back then and now..But then came this comp!Thanks Neil RushtonOur faves were...Rythim Is Rythim* It Is What It Is.. Ambient and head chilling!Blake Baxter Forever And A Day... Those strings or whatever they were...More please of them!Blake Baxter Ride Em Boy.. A cold pumping tune! A Tongue & D Groove Feel Surreal.... Sounds that made you forget what you were doing !Idol Making Un, Deux, Trois... This used to weird us out in a good way!... Stark!Juan* Techno Music..... Something else! A very something else... And so so many more shaped my then little knowledge of what on earth was going on!The pills helped too!But that was later in 89!Back in 88 it was one beer and many spliffs between us 3 teenagers from a tiny bedroom that was more like a space ship than mere sleeping quarters!The world is flat? Hmmmm maybe maybe not... ---- ....()....It is what it is!Either way music shapes it! And us.... Either way it helps us does it not?We're having BIG FUN! ;)Peace..
TheFresh
Purchase at Buyrite in Detroit when it first hit the shelves. This LP changed my life. Will always be one of my favorite records.
Bremar
It's not often a compilation is one of the most important records ever made....It's the key that opened many doors
MrDog
The first techno CD ever, legend.
Mr.Savik
This is a very overrated compilation that gets older everytime I listen to it. I agree with mjb that many of the tracks sound like house and are very dated tracks. Listen to Black Baxter - Forever And A Day or K.S Experience - Electronic Dance which are some of the tracks I least liked from this compliation. They get older, older and older the more times I listen to them. Not saying this compilation is bad. Some tracks like Rythim Is Rhythim - It Is What It Is and Juan - Techno Music while nearly as outdated as pretty much everything in this compilation are quite enjoyble and are still somewhat nostalgic. And let's not forget about Inner City - Big Fun which is considered one of the most commercially successful techno tracks in the history of the genre. Not a bad CD to pickup mainly because it has quite a bit of history.
Braendo
are you crazy!! this has some of the best techno ever made -
Styphe
It is important to get this compilation in context. It is an indulgence on anybody's part to assume Niel Rushton was at all claiming a 'discovery' or 'branding' of the genre 'Techno'. He was and still is a reveered Producer, Journalist, DJ and knowledgable ambassador for music, period.... And it was his immense passion and connections in Detriot from his years of playing and importing as A&R/Liason man of Rare Northern Soul Records that Detriot Techno (Of which Motown shared the same home) was naturally baught to his attention in the 80's in it's early incarnation by the music community who he knew intimately over years. It is true the terminology of 'Techno' and it's elements (as all nearly electronic music) originated in those early european clubs but 'Detroit - Techno' had deffinative unique elements of that 'Motown-Jazz Funk Fusion' sounds that are added to the pure electro sounds of the european influence, of which, was and is a huge influence on the ears of Juan Atkins, Eddie Fawlkes etc....... This is just one man's love of the music evolving and coinciding within the the same city of which he has been an ambassador for more than many of us can remember....PEACE!
Sirara
Very Nice posting. Thanks for your insight. I wish they had the material to do a documentary on this time in Detroit. High Tech Soul was cool, but I don't feel it captured the essence that movies like Maestro, Pump up The Volume, and others.
invasion
Only now, years and years later do I realise A Tongue & D Groove's "Feel surreal" is just a remix of Rhythim Is Rhythim's "Feel surreal" (Transmat MS6) - doh!
Zinnthi
But don't forget that the A Tongue & D Groove version of 'Feel Surreal' is the first original version.For those that don't know, A Tongue & D Groove = (A)nthony "Shake" Shakir & (D)errick "Mayday" May.
Kann
While some of the tracks have, indeed, a housey feel to them (especially Share this House), the production should be taken for what it is. It's not like high quality recording equipment was exactly affordable to the average youth in the 1980s.The KS Experience track is full of energy.
Otiel
Nobody least of all Juan Atkins would denigrate the role of Germany in experimental electronic music, this whole argument about the origination of the term 'techno' is specious. Cybotron released 'Welcome To Techno City' in 1984 http://www.discogs.com/Cybotron-Techno-City/release/19657 and it was on one of the early UK Streetsounds Electro compilations, as that's what we were calling this music in the UK at that time. But it was in reference to Kraftwerk, as anyone who has heard the Cybotron LP will attest, as that's what fired their imaginations in Detroit back then.As has also been stated below Network Records Supremo, Neil Rushton, dreamed up the name 'Techno: The New Dance sound of Detroit' to differentiate this compilation from Motown, which at the time would have been of course synonomous with 'the dance sound' of Detroit and Juan called it 'Techno' to distinguish it from what was coming out of Chicago at the same time. Ultimately these are just terms used by marketing men at various times to sell records. If you read the sleeve notes to this and the partnering 'Retro Techno: Detroit Definitive' compilation from a couple of years later, there is no debate about any of this. Respect is given where it's due. The fact that nobody took any notice of this compilation in the USA at the time is also well documented, but it wouldn't exactly be the first time an American artist had become well known in the UK before breaking it in their home country, or indeed vice versa...This is a totally seminal slice of electronica or whatever you want to call it now, and definitely should be high on anyone's list. It may sound dated in parts given what happened since but I guess nothing dates so quickly as the future...
Conjukus
Sorry, but this Talla 2XLC propaganda nonsense this guy gerasoulis94 (see below) is spouting is just plain silly. Watch the German documentary "We Call it Techno" if you doubt this, authoritative German sources on the matter spell it out plain as day. Talla states that at a record store he worked in, City Music @ Frankfurt's Central Station, he placed records by acts including New Order, Depeche Mode, Kraftwerk, Heaven 17, Front 242 in one category and called it all techno. He then opened 'Technoclub' in 1984 on Sunday afternoons @ Disco No Name. In 1987 Technoclub moved to the airport based disco Dorian Gray, where it became the centre of the Electronic Body Music (EBM) scene. Jurgen Laarman, of the electronic music fanzine Frontpage stated that 'Technoclub' had historical merit in being the first club in Germany to play almost exclusively electronic music, but it was more or less an underground thing for suburban kids, "it was never really hip to go there". Laarman stated that the music Talla was calling techno, everyone else, particularly those in Berlin, were identifying as Industrial and EBM. In the late 80s Frankfurt was still stuck with Industrial and EBM (Talla's techno) while Berlin was moving forward by embracing Acid House and the early Detroit techno.In Berlin they started using the term 'technohouse' to distinguish from Talla's Frankfurt based definition. Later the word Tekkno came to replace 'technohouse'. The first real techno club in Germany was started by DJ Tanith in Berlin, 1989, Cyberspace @ UFO, Wednesday nights. In Spring 1990 Tanith and Wolle X.D.P held the first large techno parties in East Berlin called Tekknozid. At that time the Technoclub in Frankfurt was something totally different, it was an EBM/industrial night. In Germany, during that period the definition of Techno was contested, it was essentially a Frankfurt EBM old-school conception versus the Berlin progressive take that was inspired by Chicago and Detroit. Finally, don't forget that Juan Atkins released 'Techno City' in 1984, Junie Morrison's 12" Techno-Freqs also came out in 1984, earlier we had Man Parrish's 'Techno Trax' in 82, and earlier still the Japanese electronic act Yellow Magic Orchestra's album 'Technodelic' in 1981. Talla is just some guy who bundled all early 80s electronic into one category, and called it techno, because, as he says, the music was made using electronic technology.
Detenta
It seems ridiculous to be arguing about who invented the word "techno." Obviously, no one is classifying New Order, Depeche Mode, Kraftwerk, Heaven 17, and Front 242 as techno anymore. It is probably best to think of "techno" as two words -- the early and poorly defined "techno" whose meaning has died out and the modern "techno" whose meaning continues define a specific musical genre to this day. "Techno! The New Dance Sound Of Detroit" was the first incarnation of the modern "techno" and it should be celebrated for that.
SkroN
I must say that the first time I came across the term "Techno" was on the 1982 self titled LP by Man Parrish. The track was on side 2 & was called "Techno Trax", this was straight out of the New York electro scene and was massive (Electro Beats will always kick yo ass mofo) So I'm quite sure that the good ol' US-of-A was fully aware of the term "Techno" before it filtered through the stratosphere to Europe. As for the "Sound Of Detroit" LP, this introduced me to the mind of Derrick May (Rhythim is Rhythim) for which I am eternaly grateful, it also includes the exclusive rarity that is Kevin Saunderson's "Electronic Dance"(K.S. Experience) which will rip up any dance floor to date....PERIOD. It also includes various gems by Blake Baxter, Eddie Fowlkes and the one and only Juan Atkins, this really is a top quality Techno LP. So get yer Techno trousers on and start 'aving it LARGE!!!!!Banging beats for a banging nation....U NO THE SCORE BROTHERS & SISTERS, GET DOWN..... PS.- It's Mr Atkins to you sir....Mr Juan Atkins, Godfather of Modern techno music as we presently, and always will know it, let's show some respect for a true innovator, a true legend, blessed by God....Juan.
Tane
Can't argue with that man...LOL!!!
Dalarin
Everyone has their own take on what is what, and everyone is entitled to debate the subject between themselves, as long as it's constuctive and not abusive......take note BUNKERHEADZ.....
Dog_Uoll
Grow up and shut up if you aint got anything worthwhile to say fool, engage your brain before opening your mouth, you need to sift through the history of electronic music before you comment on things you know nothing about....new beat my arse, try starting in the '60s & '70s......
Ariseym
1000 apologies to u gerasoulis94, this comment wasn't directed at u, but at the retard BUNKERHEADZ, and yes, "aint" is an English word. Lol!
WinDImmortaL
This is such great input. It really contradicts everything that I wrote. Lol
Mash
Grow up and shut up if you aint got anything worthwhile to say fool, engage your brain before opening your mouth, you need to sift through the history of electronic music before you comment on things you know nothing about....new beat my arse, try starting in the '60s & '70s......
Ariurin
The concept of "Techno" as a music genre was not heard of in the Unites States until the earliest 1991. If we were to take any usage of the word "Techno" prior to Talla 2xlc then we might as well link the "Techno Twins" as an even earler source than Man Parrish. They are totally irrelevant to what the style of music called "Techno" is. The music Saunders, Atkins, and May wrote are not recognized as innovators of "techno" music in Europe. Basically the music they wrote was EBM. It is like trying to say that the NFL in the Unites States is "Football" to the rest of the world. Techno music is the style of music that includes a heavy synth sound, with a hammering beat- a sound Created in Germany BY European- Germans. Examples of this are in the works of Talla's Robotiko Rejekto project, Talla's Bigod 20 "Body to Body" track ,the Techno Freaks "IBiza", tracks written and produced well before Detroit!. These early (80's) tracks are perfect examples of what the dictionary meaning of Techno music is. More samples of what Techno music is to the world ( Besides the USA) are tracks like Intact - Acts of Sensation, O- Das Spiel , Recall IV- Contrast, Age of Love- Age of Love, Atahualpa- Ultimo Imperio, Time Modem- Mantel Der Nacht and many more. Talla is finally being officially honored for being the first to open a "Techno" club and the first to coin the term "Techno" as a music genre. We all hail the man, Andreas Tomalla ( TALLA 2XLC) for giving the world "Techno " music.
VAZGINO
Although this might be the so-called start of the Detroit sound of Techno it had basically no significance in the United States. The album itself is mediocre at best. It is quite safe to say that a music genre called "Techno" was already in existance in Germany for quite some time before Atkins "introduced it" in the United States. Talla 2xlc (ANDREAS TOMALLA)the "FATHER OF TECHNO" had coined the word as early as 1984. Before Atkins there was surely Talla who was the creator of "Moskwa TV (with tracks like "Tekno talk" in 1987), Robotiko Rejekto (which released "Rejekto" under "Techno Drome International- the first only Techno label- in 1987, a FULL YEAR before Techno! The new dance sound of detroit), Bigod 20 and many more projects. While Techno! the new sound sound of detroit could barely get an audience, Talla's "Techno Club" became world famous. Techno! The new sound of detroit will barely be a footnote in history. Talla on the other hand IS History. The true "Father and Creator of "Techno". None came before him.
Hrguig
Although its importance in the history of dance music, and of techno in particular, cannot be understated, this incestuous compilation is not exactly brimming with the most innovative sounds and engaging compositions. With the exception of the #1 club hit Big Fun, the tunes are not very well constructed or at all memorable, perhaps a reason why it only attained modest sales when it was new.Listeners may be further surprised to hear how housey and dated the tracks are. This situation largely owes to the fact that the fledgling Detroit aesthetic, at the time, was nearly overwhelmed by the influence of the house music of nearby Chicago, and by 1988, repetitive, incongruous samples were all the rage. In fact, the word Dance in the album title was originally going to be House until the last-minute inclusion of the song Techno Music, a Speak-n-Spell sample-laden electro-house demo which is cute, but hardly a gem in the Juan Atkins repertoire.Further detracting from the listening experience, at least with headphones, is the fact that 7 of the 12 tracks, including Big Fun, are recorded in mono, their only stereo content seeming to be just artifacts of analogue transfers.Nevertheless, the tracks on this compilation fit right in with the rest of the 1987 and 1988 releases by the same crew, and it clearly inspired UK producers like Bizarre Inc, Nexus 21, and A Guy Called Gerald.
I_LOVE_228
You make no mention of Blake Baxter's 'forever and a day', a sublime piece of jacking techno with Baxter's instantly recognisable (and often perverse!) vocals riding over the top - I guess you found that poorly constructed and not memorable? All music reviews are subjective and your opinions are very well explained, it just seems you've been a little hard on this compilation which is loved by many. Just out of interest, can you name a compilation from this year or earlier that betters this one for 'innovative sounds and engaging compositions'? I'd love to hear it.
Legend 33
It is pretty much accepted that Techno, the Electronic Dance music genre born in Detroit, USA during the eighties, has on its essence a combination of Sci-Fi (Science Fiction) elements and African-American Music heritage spread mainly through the sounds of Motown and the like, from Jazz to Soul, Funk & Disco. Transformed into a whole artistic movement, it was meant to be avant-garde music made by the young students Juan Atkins, Derrick May, Kevin Saunderson, Eddie Flashin' Fowlkes, Blake Baxter, Anthony Shakir, among other pioneers. All the mentionned artists are part of this amazing compilation 'Techno - The New Dance Sound Of Detroit'. Released in 1988 under the supervision of Neil Rushton, it would change the course of Techno forever. Techno is a Movement guided by cultural essences, but also by these kids’ desires, dreams and imaginations about the Future. Among the first evidences of this futuristic influence can be found on the 'Techno Rebels' expression, part of one of the main books of the Sci-Fi writer Alvin Toffler - "Future Shock" - about the impact of the new Technologies. That book had a very significant influence on Juan Atkins (known as the Godfather of Techno) early works, suggesting the use of the term 'Techno' as the title of a new upcoming musical genre. If this Afro-American legacy left by the references of Jazz, Soul & Funk excerced a definitive impact on the new born Techno music, Science Fiction offered essential elements as well, and this is the main reason why Techno is different from any other form of Electronic Dance Music. This Sci-Fi inspiration did not imply on the existing technology necessarily, but on the whole idea of Future imagination. It was about dreaming, about trying to foresee an entire new reality, which resulted on the first electronic music genre that systematically made use of Sci-Fi expressions, and usual Astronomy terms. Some good examples can be found on Cybotrons's early music on Deep Space Records such as "Cosmic Cars" (and the proper name of the project itself, taken from the same book "Future Shock" by A. Tofler), at the same time suggesting a love heritage for Science Fiction like was on the P-Funk era of Parliament-Funkadelic and the whole Electro movement connected to the Break Dance (which also used several Sci-Fi music titles). In fact, Techno used that Sci-Fi Soulful combination as a model, but went toward new directions comparing to the other genres mentionned before, from new synth timbres to new standards, patterns and ways of music conception - all present on this amazing selection. Through the music, visual arts and other forms of human engagements, Techno would stand as a testament of a Movement created not only through Music but as a more holistic artistic perspective. Arguably considered the first major compilation of the genre, "Techno - The New Dance Sound Of Detroit" (1988) was compiled by the music expert Neil Rushton (whose career included a place inside Virgin Records staff and later as the head of Network Records). Neil was briliant in compiling a testament of the upcoming futuristic sounds of Techno that would influence not only Europe but the entire planet since then: Juan Atkins, Derrick May, Kevin Saunderson, Blake Baxter, Eddie Fowlkes, Anthony Shakir would all take part of this selection with tunes of quality and an accurate sense for the future of the dance music. The release of this compilation is considered on of the major chapters of the history of Techno and an event with almost no parallels on the genre. It is said that the last choosen tune was "Big Fun" (1987) by Inner City, a project made by Kevin Saunderson with the vocalist Paris Grey (which got the collaboration of two other major names of Techno - James Pennington and Art Forrest). "Big Fun" became one of the milestones of Techno and invaded all the radio & DJ charts since 1988, acquiring the status of a major Techno hit all time. "Techno - The New Dance Sound Of Detroit" also brought Derrick May's supreme masterpiece "It Is What It Is" for the first time on a compilation; it was released the same year as the single itself. Alain Patrick, Aug 31, 2007
Nalmezar
A must for any serious techno collector, and incidentally, the first time ever that the term 'techno' was used on a commercial album release. It's roar, original techno, Oldskool pure and simple. If you haven't heard it then you haven't really experienced techno. Quote Legend has it that when Ten Records in the UK wanted to release their famous compilation of Detroit underground dance music in 1988, the Belleville Three were asked to come up with a name to differentiate the Detroit sound from the one happening simultaneously in Chicago. Atkins insisted that his music be called “techno” and needless to say, it stuck, giving the movement its name and making Atkins the default “Godfather of Techno.”
Blackworm
What about Kraftwerk's 'techno pop'? Isn't that a use of the term techno on a commercial album release that predates this one?
Tujar
It is pretty much accepted that Techno, the Electronic Dance music genre born in Detroit, USA during the eighties, has on its essence a combination of Sci-Fi (Science Fiction) elements and African-American Music heritage spread mainly through the sounds of Motown and the like, from Jazz to Soul, Funk & Disco. Transformed into a whole artistic movement, it was meant to be avant-garde music made by the young students Juan Atkins, Derrick May, Kevin Saunderson, Eddie Flashin' Fowlkes, Blake Baxter, Anthony Shakir, among other pioneers. All the mentionned artists are part of this amazing compilation 'Techno - The New Dance Sound Of Detroit'. Released in 1988 under the supervision of Neil Rushton, it would change the course of Techno forever. Techno is a Movement guided by cultural essences, but also by these kids’ desires, dreams and imaginations about the Future. Among the first evidences of this futuristic influence can be found on the 'Techno Rebels' expression, part of one of the main books of the Sci-Fi writer Alvin Toffler - "Future Shock" - about the impact of the new Technologies. That book had a very significant influence on Juan Atkins (known as the Godfather of Techno) early works, suggesting the use of the term 'Techno' as the title of a new upcoming musical genre. If this Afro-American legacy left by the references of Jazz, Soul & Funk excerced a definitive impact on the new born Techno music, Science Fiction offered essential elements as well, and this is the main reason why Techno is different from any other form of Electronic Dance Music. This Sci-Fi inspiration did not imply on the existing technology necessarily, but on the whole idea of Future imagination. It was about dreaming, about trying to foresee an entire new reality, which resulted on the first electronic music genre that systematically made use of Sci-Fi expressions, and usual Astronomy terms. Some good examples can be found on Cybotrons's early music on Deep Space Records such as "Cosmic Cars" (and the proper name of the project itself, taken from the same book "Future Shock" by A. Tofler), at the same time suggesting a love heritage for Science Fiction like was on the P-Funk era of Parliament-Funkadelic and the whole Electro movement connected to the Break Dance (which also used several Sci-Fi music titles). In fact, Techno used that Sci-Fi Soulful combination as a model, but went toward new directions comparing to the other genres mentionned before, from new synth timbres to new standards, patterns and ways of music conception - all present on this amazing selection. Through the music, visual arts and other forms of human engagements, Techno would stand as a testament of a Movement created not only through Music but as a more holistic artistic perspective. Arguably considered the first major compilation of the genre, "Techno - The New Dance Sound Of Detroit" (1988) was compiled by the music expert Neil Rushton (whose career included a place inside Virgin Records staff and later as the head of Network Records). Neil was briliant in compiling a testament of the upcoming futuristic sounds of Techno that would influence not only Europe but the entire planet since then: Juan Atkins, Derrick May, Kevin Saunderson, Blake Baxter, Eddie Fowlkes, Anthony Shakir would all take part of this selection with tunes of quality and an accurate sense for the future of the dance music. The release of this compilation is considered on of the major chapters of the history of Techno and an event with almost no parallels on the genre. It is said that the last choosen tune was "Big Fun" (1987) by Inner City, a project made by Kevin Saunderson with the vocalist Paris Grey (which got the collaboration of two other major names of Techno - James Pennington and Art Forrest). "Big Fun" became one of the milestones of Techno and invaded all the radio & DJ charts since 1988, acquiring the status of a major Techno hit all time. "Techno - The New Dance Sound Of Detroit" also brought Derrick May's supreme masterpiece "It Is What It Is" for the first time on a compilation; it was released the same year as the single itself.
Fearlessdweller
This compilation was concieved and put together by Neil Rushton (later owner of the Kool Kat/Network labels), and was originally going to be called " The New House Sound Of Detroit" and was only changed after Juan Atkins brought in the tune ' Techno Music' that the title was changed. They actually had trouble finding tracks for the album that were good enough, and fitted the vibe, and nearing the release were still 2 tracks missing. Derrick May recorded 'ItIs What It Is' especially for this album (although he later released in on Transmat). They were still one tune short when Kevin Saunderson brought in a box full of tapes of tracks he'd made, 'Big Fun' was in there, and the rest is history.
Cildorais
This is an important album for anyone interested in the history of techno, as well as the direction of Detroit. While so many of you in Europe & the rest of the world recognize its signifigance, here in America it is still so unknown that I found this album in a bin at a second-hand clothing store for $0.25 (£0.14) B-Bax does shine on this album, & it makes me wonder why he, like ADT, still ended up like a little brother to the Belleville Three. Saunderson is also excellent, especially Electronic Dance & Big Fun. If his sound were dated, he would not continue to be at the forefront today.
Kirizan
Once again, this compilation is great, especially the Blake Baxter tracks... I don't think they are underproduced, the production standards nowadays are far better than 1988. Despite there are hits like "Big Fun" it contains more funk than the most recent output from detroit. Oldskool detroit in all his directions rules, it's strenght is definitely being creative and made with spirit in spite the lack of proper production equipment...
Uafrmaine
This was one of the first Detroit techno records ever exported from the US. A representative of the record company came to visit Derrick (May) in Detroit and compiled a "who´s who" album of Detroit techno masters. The last track to be put on this album was Inner City´s Big Fun which became an enormous hit. More inside scoop on this issue and the techno scene´s birth in general can be found in the excellent book "Techno rebels" by Dan Sicko. If you´re into early techno, it is a must-read! I´ve just finished it and it was brilliant!
Stonewing
This is seminal compilation. Legend has it that the artists were asked how to distinguish their music from the sounds coming from Chicago and Juan Atkins said call it Techno, giving birth to the term. Supposedly Derrick May was against it.